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Dementia Support

Picture person helping dementia patient

What is Dementia?
Dementia refers to a person’s inability to store facts from what they are experiencing around them. Some of the well-known diseases that produce it, include Alzheimer’s, Pick’s, Multi-infarct Dementia, Huntingdon’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Parkinson’s.

The Effects of Dementia in the Family
Experiencing the changes in a loved one who has Alzheimer’s Disease or a related dementia is extremely difficult. Real challenges come as a dementia sufferer starts to lose their memory, followed by their speech and faculties. In many cases, family members find themselves in a strange type of bereavement, coping with the loss of the personality of their relative, while still physically caring for them. Those carers themselves often need a break, particularly if looking after a relative with the more advanced stages of Alzheimer’s disease; requiring the provision of suitable care homes and professionally qualified carers who understand the issues involved.

The Mumby’s Solution
We know that dementia is a real challenge which will not go away and support for people with dementia requires that extra level of skill which helps to prevent excessive stress. We believe that every day and every visit does not need to cause upset for those whose loved one has dementia. We can provide you with specialised care for your family loved one. Our staff members continuously undertake ‘dementia sense’ coaching classes at our training centre via small groups. We use practical workbooks which have been designed specifically to provide the interpersonal skills and insights required to work with and understand the challenges of dementia.

Our staff are fully trained and dedicated to helping each person achieve and maintain the highest level of independence and involvement within the home by focusing on current abilities, interests and the family’s needs. They are experienced caregivers and well-trained in the special needs related to dementia, including behavioural and communication problems.

Daily activities vary according to the person’s unique interests and to ensure the best possible care, detailed assessment and a care plan is completed in partnership with the family. Staff and family are encouraged to identify those areas which ‘fit’ in the life experiences of the loved one. They will often include favourites, like, games, reading topics, cooking, gardening, painting, crosswords, music, puzzles, singing, reminiscing, dancing etc.

Please contact us for further help and guidance about your own unique situation.

Counting the true cost of Dementia…
According to a new report, the cost of handling dementia amounts to one percent of global GDP, or $388 billion a year, when you factor in the real costs involved, including the large amount of unpaid family care provided. And the scary thing is, that cost appears set to rise, as we humans live longer.

The World Alzheimer’s Report 2010, assembled by researchers in Stockholm and London, reckons around 35.6 million people worldwide currently suffer from dementia. Worse still, that figure will almost double by 2030.

In the same week the report was launched, researchers at Oxford University also revealed promising results from trials. It is suggested that vitamin B may have a role to play in slowing or halting the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.  The 168 people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who were treated with a cocktail of vitamin B based supplements, showed a 53 per cent reduction in brain shrinkage normally associated with dementia.  So significant were the results, they promise to change the whole direction of Alzheimer’s research. But, while that may be a crumb of hope for the future, here in the UK, we currently have 750,000 people living with dementia – all of whom need varying degrees of help, support and care.  And the human cost of providing that care, often unpaid, can be substantial. Author Andrea Gillies wrote about the experience of looking after her mother in law Nancy in her book, Keeper, detailing the impact on her whole family. She admits that their plans to move into a larger, family house was unsuccessful, as Nancy became less and less able to cope sharing a home with relatives who she came to know only as strangers, as her dementia advanced.

Real challenges come as a dementia sufferer starts to lose their memory, followed by their speech and faculties. In many cases, family members find themselves in a strange type of bereavement, coping with the loss of the personality of their relative, while still physically caring for them. And those carers often need a break themselves, particularly if looking after a relative with the more advanced stages of Alzheimer’s disease; requiring the provision of suitable care homes and professionally qualified carers who understand the issues involved.